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Explore the Comprehensive Interactive Database of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Map List

16 maps found
  • 1948 War

    last update: 2016-11-24 04:25
    Known in Israel as the War of Independence, and in the Arab World as the Nakba (Catastrophe). The war began on 30 November 1947 as a civil conflict between Jews and Arabs in Palestine, immediately following the adoption of UNGA Resolution 181 that approved the Partition Plan for Palestine. Following the termination of the Mandate for Palestine and the Israeli Declaration of Independence, military forces from seven Arab countries invaded Palestine and began fighting the newly-created Israel Defense Forces (IDF). The war ended in 1949 with Israel signing separate armistice agreements with Egypt, Lebanon, Jordan and Syria, leaving it in control of the entire territory allocated to the Jewish state in the Partition Plan, as well as more than half of the territory allocated to the Arab state. Following the 1967 Six Day War, the armistice lines became collectively known as the (4 June) 1967 Lines or the Green Line. The war resulted in hundreds of thousands of Palestinian refugees.
  • Six Day War (1967)

    last update: 2016-09-14 06:56
    Also known as the 1967 War, and in Arabic as the Naksa (Setback), a war fought between Israel and three Arab countries - Egypt, Syria and Jordan - on 5-11 June 1967. The war began with Operation Moked, a series of preemptive Israeli airstrikes which effectively incapacitated the Egyptian and Syrian Air Forces. During the ground assault that followed, Israeli forces overran the Golan Heights, the West Bank (including East Jerusalem), the Gaza Strip and the Sinai Peninsula. Israeli territorial gains were confirmed in the ceasefire agreements concluding the war. Following the war, the UN Security Council adopted Resolution 242, which stressed “the inadmissibility of the acquisition of territory by war” and required an Israeli withdrawal, the extent of which remains under dispute. Israel formally annexed East Jerusalem in late 1967 and the Golan Heights in 1981, while the Sinai Peninsula was returned to Egypt following the 1979 peace treaty between the countries. The Gaza Strip and the West Bank remain under Israeli control and have come to be known as the Palestinian Territories. Israel lost around 800 soldiers during the war, while Arab casualties numbered some 15,000–20,000 soldiers.
  • Israel-Jordan Armistice Agreement (1949)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:36
    An armistice agreement concluding the 1948 War between Israel and Jordan, signed in Rhodes, Greece, on 3 April 1949. It left a large portion of the territory west of the Jordan River, consequently known as the West Bank, under Jordanian control, with Jordanian forces taking over certain positions from Iraqi forces. Part of the armistice line, separating the West Bank from Israeli territory and bisecting the city of Jerusalem, came to be known as the Green Line. Around Latrun, west of Jerusalem, as well as in small areas inside the city, a no man’s land was established. The rest of the armistice line followed the 1922 border between Palestine and Transjordan. The total length of the armistice line was 637km, of which 330km constitute the border between Israel and the West Bank. Jordan officially annexed the West Bank in 1950, a move that was only recognized by Britain and Pakistan. Israel took control of the West Bank as a result of the 1967 Six Day War, and in 1988 Jordan waived all claims to the territory.
  • Mintz, Elitzur and Porat's Peace on Earth Plan (2006)

    last update: 2016-01-31 06:00
    A plan for the resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, put forward in January 2006 by Adi Mintz, Uri Elitzur and Hanan Porat, three prominent leaders in the Israeli settler movement. The plan suggested a crackdown against Palestinian terrorism, followed by a long-term interim arrangement involving Israeli annexation of roughly 60 percent of the West Bank, granting full Israeli citizenship to around 300,000 Palestinians. The rest of the West Bank would be under a Palestinian administration forming a confederation with Jordan. Separate transportation systems would ensure uninterrupted movement of people and goods within each community. The interim period would then be followed by a permanent status agreement in cooperation with Jordan and Egypt, with the latter providing territory for the expansion of the Gaza Strip, whose status would be determined in Egyptian-Palestinian negotiations.
  • Demarcation of the Palestine-Transjordan Border in the Gulf of Aqaba (1946)

    last update: 2016-01-31 06:03
    A technical agreement concluded between the heads of the Survey Departments of Mandatory Palestine and Transjordan, demarcating the border between the two territories near the Gulf of Aqaba, and resolving an ambiguity in the 1922 Transjordan Memorandum that separated them.
  • Map of Arab Localities Transferred to Israel in the Israel-Jordan Armistice Agreement (1949)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:21
    Reference map of Arab localities that were under Jordanian control at the conclusion of the 1948 War, but subsequently transferred to Israel under the terms of the 1949 armistice agreement between the two countries. In return, Israel transferred control of Arab localities in the Hebron area. The areas in question, known as Wadi Ara and the Little Triangle, contain a large portion of Israel's Arab population.
  • Israel-Jordan Peace Treaty (1994)

    last update: 2016-01-31 04:47
    A peace treaty between Israel and Jordan, signed at the Wadi Araba Border Crossing on 26 October 1994. It followed the Washington Declaration of July 1995 which officially ended the state of war between the two countries. The treaty was signed by Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Jordanian Prime Minister Abdul Salam al-Majali and witnessed by US President Bill Clinton. Also in attendance were Israeli President Ezer Weizmann, King Hussein of Jordan and US Secretary of State Warren Christopher. The treaty established peace and mutual recognition between the two countries; determined the international boundary on the basis of the 1922 Transjordan Memorandum, without prejudice to the future status of the Palestinian Territories, and with special arrangements for the Baqura/Naharayim area; recognized Jordan’s special role with regard to the Historical Basin in Jerusalem; and established full diplomatic relations, as well as cooperation in security and civil affairs.
  • Allon Plan (1967)

    last update: 2016-01-31 04:05
    A plan proposed by Israeli Minister of Labor and former general Yigal Allon shortly after the Six Day War.
  • “Little Triangle” - Jordan-Israel Armistice Agreement (1949)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:05
    A map of the “Little Triangle”, an area containing Arab localities that was under Jordanian control at the conclusion of the 1948 War, but was ceded to Israel as part of the 1949 Israel-Jordan Armistice Agreement.
  • Paris Peace Conference (1919)

    last update: 2016-01-31 03:25
    An international conference held in Paris during 1919, following the conclusion of World War I. During the conference, the victorious Allied Powers, chiefly the United States, Britain, France, Italy and Japan, sought to reach an understanding with regard to the political outcomes of the war, especially the status of territories previously controlled by the defeated Central Powers. Zionist representatives to the conference presented their territorial claims, extending over Palestine and areas of the surrounding countries (Transjordan, Syria, Lebanon and Egypt).