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Explore the Comprehensive Interactive Database of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Map List

17 maps found
  • 1948 War

    last update: 2016-11-24 04:25
    Known in Israel as the War of Independence, and in the Arab World as the Nakba (Catastrophe). The war began on 30 November 1947 as a civil conflict between Jews and Arabs in Palestine, immediately following the adoption of UNGA Resolution 181 that approved the Partition Plan for Palestine. Following the termination of the Mandate for Palestine and the Israeli Declaration of Independence, military forces from seven Arab countries invaded Palestine and began fighting the newly-created Israel Defense Forces (IDF). The war ended in 1949 with Israel signing separate armistice agreements with Egypt, Lebanon, Jordan and Syria, leaving it in control of the entire territory allocated to the Jewish state in the Partition Plan, as well as more than half of the territory allocated to the Arab state. Following the 1967 Six Day War, the armistice lines became collectively known as the (4 June) 1967 Lines or the Green Line. The war resulted in hundreds of thousands of Palestinian refugees.
  • Six Day War (1967)

    last update: 2016-09-14 06:56
    Also known as the 1967 War, and in Arabic as the Naksa (Setback), a war fought between Israel and three Arab countries - Egypt, Syria and Jordan - on 5-11 June 1967. The war began with Operation Moked, a series of preemptive Israeli airstrikes which effectively incapacitated the Egyptian and Syrian Air Forces. During the ground assault that followed, Israeli forces overran the Golan Heights, the West Bank (including East Jerusalem), the Gaza Strip and the Sinai Peninsula. Israeli territorial gains were confirmed in the ceasefire agreements concluding the war. Following the war, the UN Security Council adopted Resolution 242, which stressed “the inadmissibility of the acquisition of territory by war” and required an Israeli withdrawal, the extent of which remains under dispute. Israel formally annexed East Jerusalem in late 1967 and the Golan Heights in 1981, while the Sinai Peninsula was returned to Egypt following the 1979 peace treaty between the countries. The Gaza Strip and the West Bank remain under Israeli control and have come to be known as the Palestinian Territories. Israel lost around 800 soldiers during the war, while Arab casualties numbered some 15,000–20,000 soldiers.
  • Israel-Egypt Armistice Agreement (1949)

    last update: 2016-09-13 01:23
    An armistice agreement concluding the 1948 War between Israel and Egypt, signed in Rhodes, Greece, on 24 February 1949. It mostly followed the 1906 border between Egypt and the Ottoman Empire, while leaving the Gaza Strip under Egyptian control.
  • Mintz, Elitzur and Porat's Peace on Earth Plan (2006)

    last update: 2016-01-31 06:00
    A plan for the resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, put forward in January 2006 by Adi Mintz, Uri Elitzur and Hanan Porat, three prominent leaders in the Israeli settler movement. The plan suggested a crackdown against Palestinian terrorism, followed by a long-term interim arrangement involving Israeli annexation of roughly 60 percent of the West Bank, granting full Israeli citizenship to around 300,000 Palestinians. The rest of the West Bank would be under a Palestinian administration forming a confederation with Jordan. Separate transportation systems would ensure uninterrupted movement of people and goods within each community. The interim period would then be followed by a permanent status agreement in cooperation with Jordan and Egypt, with the latter providing territory for the expansion of the Gaza Strip, whose status would be determined in Egyptian-Palestinian negotiations.
  • Firman Granting Muhammad Ali Rule Over Egypt (1841)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:54
    A firman, or royal decree, granted by Sultan Abdülmecid I of the Ottoman Empire to the ruler of Egypt, Albanian-born general Muhammad Ali Pasha, in 1841. Following Ali’s successful rebellion against the Sultan, the latter agreed to name him the hereditary khedive (viceroy) of Egypt, effectively recognizing his independence, in return to an Egyptian withdrawal from Syria and other areas. The boundary thus established, which left most of the Sinai Peninsula under Ottoman control, became the first recognized border between Egypt and Syria/Palestine.
  • Mukhtar Pasha Proposal for the Egyptian-Ottoman Border (1892)

    last update: 2016-01-31 06:02
    A proposal submitted to the Egyptian and British governments in 1892 by Mukhtar Pasha, the Ottoman representative in Cairo, as to the border between Egypt and the Ottoman Empire. The proposal suggested that the border run from Rafah to Suez and hence to Aqaba, leaving about one-third of the Sinai Peninsula in Ottoman hands. The rejection of this proposal eventually led to the Rafah-Suez line becoming the effective border, and a similar line was formally agreed on in 1906.
  • Israel-Egypt Peace Treaty (1979)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:30
    A peace treaty between Israel and Egypt signed in Washington, DC, on 26 March 1979. It was signed by Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin, and witnessed by US President Jimmy Carter. The treaty was the culmination of negotiations which began with Sadat’s visit to Jerusalem in 1977, and followed the framework established in the Camp David Accords of 1978, for which Sadat and Begin were awarded that year’s Nobel Peace Prize. According to the treaty, Israel was to withdraw all military and civilian presence from the Sinai Peninsula, returning to the 1949 armistice line. This included the evacuation of a number of Israeli settlements established since 1967, notably the towns of Ofira (Sharm el-Sheikh) and Yamit (near El-Arish). The withdrawal was completed in June 1982. Egypt agreed to the demilitarization of the Sinai Peninsula, except for limited police presence, monitored by the Multinational Force and Observers (MFO) created in 1981. In addition, diplomatic and trade relations were established between the two countries.
  • Israeli-Egyptian Interim Agreement (Sinai II, 1975)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:27
    An agreement between Egypt and Israel that was signed in Geneva, Switzerland, on 4 September 1975, subsequent to the Disengagement Agreement of 18 January 1974. In addition to further redeployment of their armed forces, the two countries resolved “not to resort to the threat or use of force or military blockade against each other”, to observe the ceasefire ending the 1973 War, and to pursue a peace settlement based on UN Security Council Resolution 338. The day before it was signed, the agreement was approved by the Knesset with a vote of 70 For, 43 Against, 7 Abstaining.
  • Modus Vivendi to the Egyptian-Israeli General Armistice (1950)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:23
    A modus vivendi, or provisional understanding, signed between Israel and Egypt on 22 February 1950, and meant to complement the 1949 Israel-Egypt Armistice Agreement. In the interest of reducing tensions along the border between Israel and the Gaza Strip, the understanding establishes three zones, one on the Israeli and two on the Egyptian side of the armistice line, and limits the amount and armament of military personnel in these zones. The agreement also provided for limited territorial exchange, with Egypt receiving additional territory at the intersection of the Israel-Gaza Strip-Egypt borders, while Israel was compensated with a strip of territory along the northeastern border of the Gaza Strip.
  • Israel-Egypt Disengagement Agreement (1974)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:25
    An agreement between Israel and Egypt facilitating withdrawals by both countries’ armed forces following the 1973 War, signed on 18 January 1974 on the 101km marker of the Cairo-Suez road. It involved the redeployment of Egyptian forces west of the Suez Canal, and Israeli forces east of it, with a buffer zone on both sides of the canal monitored by the United Nations Emergency Force (UNEF). The agreement, signed by the chiefs of staff of both armies, was specifically mentioned not to be a “final peace agreement”, but the first step towards peace. A similar agreement was signed between Israel and Syria on 31 May 1974.