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Explore the Comprehensive Interactive Database of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Map List

169 maps found
  • Israeli Settlements in the West Bank by Organization

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:45
    Reference map showing Israeli settlements in the West Bank, categorized by the organization responsible for their establishment.
  • Firman Granting Muhammad Ali Rule Over Egypt (1841)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:54
    A firman, or royal decree, granted by Sultan Abdülmecid I of the Ottoman Empire to the ruler of Egypt, Albanian-born general Muhammad Ali Pasha, in 1841. Following Ali’s successful rebellion against the Sultan, the latter agreed to name him the hereditary khedive (viceroy) of Egypt, effectively recognizing his independence, in return to an Egyptian withdrawal from Syria and other areas. The boundary thus established, which left most of the Sinai Peninsula under Ottoman control, became the first recognized border between Egypt and Syria/Palestine.
  • Israeli Settlements in the Gaza Strip (2005)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:47
    Reference map showing Israeli settlements in the Gaza Strip in 2005, on the eve of the implementation of the Disengagement Plan, during which all settlements were removed and their inhabitants relocated to Israel. This includes construction that took place from 1993 to 2005. Upon the evacuation, the Gaza Strip contained 17 Israeli settlements, housing around 8,000 inhabitants.
  • Government of Israel Resolution 3283 on the Separation Barrier (2005)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:44
    A resolution adopted by the Government of Israel under Prime Minister Ariel Sharon on 20 February 2005, subsequent to GOI Resolutions 2077 and 883
  • Government of Israel Resolution 4783 on the Separation Barrier (2006)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:44
    A resolution adopted by the Government of Israel under Acting Prime Minister Ehud Olmert on 30 April 2006, subsequent to GOI Resolutions 2077, 883 and 3283.
  • Israel-Syria Disengagement Agreement (1974)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:41
    An agreement between Israel and Syria facilitating withdrawals by both countries’ armed forces following the 1973 War, signed on 31 May 1974 in Geneva, Switzerland, ending a period of attrition warfare following the ceasefire. As part of the agreement, Israel agreed to withdraw from territories it held beyond the 1967 ceasefire lines. The agreement delineated two disengagement lines, with the buffer zone between them monitored by the newly-established United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF). It also contained provisions for a mutual exchange of POWs. The lines established in the agreement continue to serve as the de facto border between Israel and Syria. A similar agreement was signed between Israel and Egypt on 18 January 1974.
  • Israel-Syria Armistice Agreement (1949)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:39
    An armistice agreement concluding the 1948 War between Israel and Syria, signed on Hill 232 near the Israeli-Syrian border, on 20 July 1949. As the last agreement signed between Israel and an Arab country, it brought the war to its official conclusion. The armistice line largely followed the 1923 Mandatory border, though differences between the two lines were a source of disagreement during the Israeli-Syrian peace negotiations. Three areas west of the armistice line that were controlled by Syrian forces at the time of the signing were designated in the agreement as demilitarized zones: the Banias area at the northern end of the armistice line; the area south of Lake Hula, and a narrow strip along the Jordan River up to the Sea of Galilee; and the area southeast of the Sea of Galilee and along the Yarmuk River up to El-Hama.
  • Israel-Jordan Armistice Agreement (1949)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:36
    An armistice agreement concluding the 1948 War between Israel and Jordan, signed in Rhodes, Greece, on 3 April 1949. It left a large portion of the territory west of the Jordan River, consequently known as the West Bank, under Jordanian control, with Jordanian forces taking over certain positions from Iraqi forces. Part of the armistice line, separating the West Bank from Israeli territory and bisecting the city of Jerusalem, came to be known as the Green Line. Around Latrun, west of Jerusalem, as well as in small areas inside the city, a no man’s land was established. The rest of the armistice line followed the 1922 border between Palestine and Transjordan. The total length of the armistice line was 637km, of which 330km constitute the border between Israel and the West Bank. Jordan officially annexed the West Bank in 1950, a move that was only recognized by Britain and Pakistan. Israel took control of the West Bank as a result of the 1967 Six Day War, and in 1988 Jordan waived all claims to the territory.
  • Jewish Agency Partition Plan (1946)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:34
    A proposal for the partition of Palestine put forth by the Jewish Agency Executive in July 1946 in response to the work of the Anglo-American Committee and parallel to the Morrison-Grady Scheme. The plan called for a Jewish state to be established over the coastal plain, the Galilee and the Negev, with an Arab state roughly covering the modern-day West Bank, and the Jerusalem area to be placed under international administration.
  • Jewish Agency Partition Proposal to the Woodhead Commission (1938)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:33
    A proposal submitted by the Jewish Agency, chaired by David Ben-Gurion, to the Woodhead Commission, a British Royal Commission mandated with drawing up proposals for the partition of Palestine. The proposal was examined in Chapters IX (Jerusalem) and XII (the rest of Palestine) of the Commission’s final report, published in November 1938. Its proposed borders for the Jewish state included all of the Galilee, most of the coastal plain and a corridor linking it to the Jewish neighborhoods in Jerusalem. The Arab state was to include today’s northern West Bank, the northern Negev and Jaffa, with the rest - including a corridor linking the Jerusalem area to Jaffa through the Lydda airport - remaining under Mandatory control.