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Explore the Comprehensive Interactive Database of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Map List

38 maps found
  • Second Bernadotte Plan (1948)

    last update: 2016-01-31 06:05
    A plan proposed by UN mediator Folke Bernadotte on 15 September 1948, following the rejection of his earlier plan by both sides, aimed at bringing an end to the 1948 War and resolving the question of Palestine. He noted that implementation of the original Partition Plan has become unrealistic due to the situation on the ground and reservations made by both sides. The revised plan abandoned the idea of an economic union, called for an international regime in Jerusalem, as well as for the return of Palestinian refugees to their homes, and made territorial suggestions similar to those in the earlier plan. The day following the publication of the plan, Bernadotte was assassinated by Zionist militia Lehi in Jerusalem. Work Status:
  • Demarcation of the Palestine-Transjordan Border in the Gulf of Aqaba (1946)

    last update: 2016-01-31 06:03
    A technical agreement concluded between the heads of the Survey Departments of Mandatory Palestine and Transjordan, demarcating the border between the two territories near the Gulf of Aqaba, and resolving an ambiguity in the 1922 Transjordan Memorandum that separated them.
  • Mintz, Elitzur and Porat's Peace on Earth Plan (2006)

    last update: 2016-01-31 06:00
    A plan for the resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, put forward in January 2006 by Adi Mintz, Uri Elitzur and Hanan Porat, three prominent leaders in the Israeli settler movement. The plan suggested a crackdown against Palestinian terrorism, followed by a long-term interim arrangement involving Israeli annexation of roughly 60 percent of the West Bank, granting full Israeli citizenship to around 300,000 Palestinians. The rest of the West Bank would be under a Palestinian administration forming a confederation with Jordan. Separate transportation systems would ensure uninterrupted movement of people and goods within each community. The interim period would then be followed by a permanent status agreement in cooperation with Jordan and Egypt, with the latter providing territory for the expansion of the Gaza Strip, whose status would be determined in Egyptian-Palestinian negotiations.
  • Annapolis Process - Israeli Proposal - General (2008)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:56
    An Israeli proposal for a permanent territorial settlement put forth in 2008 during the Annapolis Process, including territorial exchange involving the transfer of 6.5 percent of the West Bank to Israel, in exchange for Israeli territories amounting to 5.8 percent, with a further 0.7 percent constituting a corridor between the Gaza Strip and the West Bank.
  • Israel-Egypt Peace Treaty (1979)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:30
    A peace treaty between Israel and Egypt signed in Washington, DC, on 26 March 1979. It was signed by Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin, and witnessed by US President Jimmy Carter. The treaty was the culmination of negotiations which began with Sadat’s visit to Jerusalem in 1977, and followed the framework established in the Camp David Accords of 1978, for which Sadat and Begin were awarded that year’s Nobel Peace Prize. According to the treaty, Israel was to withdraw all military and civilian presence from the Sinai Peninsula, returning to the 1949 armistice line. This included the evacuation of a number of Israeli settlements established since 1967, notably the towns of Ofira (Sharm el-Sheikh) and Yamit (near El-Arish). The withdrawal was completed in June 1982. Egypt agreed to the demilitarization of the Sinai Peninsula, except for limited police presence, monitored by the Multinational Force and Observers (MFO) created in 1981. In addition, diplomatic and trade relations were established between the two countries.
  • Avner Defense Plan (June 1937)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:01
    A “national defense scheme” for the Jewish population in Palestine authored by Elimelech ‘Avner’ Zelikowitz, a member of the Haganah, the largest Zionist militia, in June 1937. The plan was prepared in response to a request by Haganah leadership, ahead of the possible termination of the Mandate for Palestine and outbreak of a Jewish-Arab civil war. The scheme detailed the military, financial and territorial outlines of the Jewish war effort, based on a phased advancement from north to south.
  • Jewish Agency Partition Proposal to the Woodhead Commission (1938)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:33
    A proposal submitted by the Jewish Agency, chaired by David Ben-Gurion, to the Woodhead Commission, a British Royal Commission mandated with drawing up proposals for the partition of Palestine. The proposal was examined in Chapters IX (Jerusalem) and XII (the rest of Palestine) of the Commission’s final report, published in November 1938. Its proposed borders for the Jewish state included all of the Galilee, most of the coastal plain and a corridor linking it to the Jewish neighborhoods in Jerusalem. The Arab state was to include today’s northern West Bank, the northern Negev and Jaffa, with the rest - including a corridor linking the Jerusalem area to Jaffa through the Lydda airport - remaining under Mandatory control.
  • Jewish Agency Partition Plan (1946)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:34
    A proposal for the partition of Palestine put forth by the Jewish Agency Executive in July 1946 in response to the work of the Anglo-American Committee and parallel to the Morrison-Grady Scheme. The plan called for a Jewish state to be established over the coastal plain, the Galilee and the Negev, with an Arab state roughly covering the modern-day West Bank, and the Jerusalem area to be placed under international administration.
  • League of Nations Mandate for Palestine (1922)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:04
    A legal document adopted by the League of Nations on 24 July 1922. It established the United Kingdom as a Mandatory in control of Palestine, which had been officially under military government since the British occupied it from the Ottoman Empire during World War I. It was based on the Sykes-Picot Agreement and the understandings reached at the Paris and San Remo Conferences. The document provided for the administration of Palestine by the British with the aim of establishing the Jewish national home as mentioned in the 1917 Balfour Declaration, ensuring that the rights and positions of other communities in Palestine, as well as holy places, be preserved. Article 25 of the Mandate allowed the British, with the consent of the League of Nations, to “withhold or postpone” the application of certain provisions of the Mandate with regard to the territory east of the Jordan River and administer it separately from the rest of Palestine, a right which it exercised with the Transjordan Memorandum later in 1922.
  • Israel-Jordan Peace Treaty (1994)

    last update: 2016-01-31 04:47
    A peace treaty between Israel and Jordan, signed at the Wadi Araba Border Crossing on 26 October 1994. It followed the Washington Declaration of July 1995 which officially ended the state of war between the two countries. The treaty was signed by Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Jordanian Prime Minister Abdul Salam al-Majali and witnessed by US President Bill Clinton. Also in attendance were Israeli President Ezer Weizmann, King Hussein of Jordan and US Secretary of State Warren Christopher. The treaty established peace and mutual recognition between the two countries; determined the international boundary on the basis of the 1922 Transjordan Memorandum, without prejudice to the future status of the Palestinian Territories, and with special arrangements for the Baqura/Naharayim area; recognized Jordan’s special role with regard to the Historical Basin in Jerusalem; and established full diplomatic relations, as well as cooperation in security and civil affairs.