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Explore the Comprehensive Interactive Database of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Map List

169 maps found
  • Israel-Syria Armistice Agreement (1949)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:39
    An armistice agreement concluding the 1948 War between Israel and Syria, signed on Hill 232 near the Israeli-Syrian border, on 20 July 1949. As the last agreement signed between Israel and an Arab country, it brought the war to its official conclusion. The armistice line largely followed the 1923 Mandatory border, though differences between the two lines were a source of disagreement during the Israeli-Syrian peace negotiations. Three areas west of the armistice line that were controlled by Syrian forces at the time of the signing were designated in the agreement as demilitarized zones: the Banias area at the northern end of the armistice line; the area south of Lake Hula, and a narrow strip along the Jordan River up to the Sea of Galilee; and the area southeast of the Sea of Galilee and along the Yarmuk River up to El-Hama.
  • Israel-Jordan Armistice Agreement (1949)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:36
    An armistice agreement concluding the 1948 War between Israel and Jordan, signed in Rhodes, Greece, on 3 April 1949. It left a large portion of the territory west of the Jordan River, consequently known as the West Bank, under Jordanian control, with Jordanian forces taking over certain positions from Iraqi forces. Part of the armistice line, separating the West Bank from Israeli territory and bisecting the city of Jerusalem, came to be known as the Green Line. Around Latrun, west of Jerusalem, as well as in small areas inside the city, a no man’s land was established. The rest of the armistice line followed the 1922 border between Palestine and Transjordan. The total length of the armistice line was 637km, of which 330km constitute the border between Israel and the West Bank. Jordan officially annexed the West Bank in 1950, a move that was only recognized by Britain and Pakistan. Israel took control of the West Bank as a result of the 1967 Six Day War, and in 1988 Jordan waived all claims to the territory.
  • Jewish Agency Partition Plan (1946)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:34
    A proposal for the partition of Palestine put forth by the Jewish Agency Executive in July 1946 in response to the work of the Anglo-American Committee and parallel to the Morrison-Grady Scheme. The plan called for a Jewish state to be established over the coastal plain, the Galilee and the Negev, with an Arab state roughly covering the modern-day West Bank, and the Jerusalem area to be placed under international administration.
  • Jewish Agency Partition Proposal to the Woodhead Commission (1938)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:33
    A proposal submitted by the Jewish Agency, chaired by David Ben-Gurion, to the Woodhead Commission, a British Royal Commission mandated with drawing up proposals for the partition of Palestine. The proposal was examined in Chapters IX (Jerusalem) and XII (the rest of Palestine) of the Commission’s final report, published in November 1938. Its proposed borders for the Jewish state included all of the Galilee, most of the coastal plain and a corridor linking it to the Jewish neighborhoods in Jerusalem. The Arab state was to include today’s northern West Bank, the northern Negev and Jaffa, with the rest - including a corridor linking the Jerusalem area to Jaffa through the Lydda airport - remaining under Mandatory control.
  • Israel-Syria Disengagement Agreement (1974)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:41
    An agreement between Israel and Syria facilitating withdrawals by both countries’ armed forces following the 1973 War, signed on 31 May 1974 in Geneva, Switzerland, ending a period of attrition warfare following the ceasefire. As part of the agreement, Israel agreed to withdraw from territories it held beyond the 1967 ceasefire lines. The agreement delineated two disengagement lines, with the buffer zone between them monitored by the newly-established United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF). It also contained provisions for a mutual exchange of POWs. The lines established in the agreement continue to serve as the de facto border between Israel and Syria. A similar agreement was signed between Israel and Egypt on 18 January 1974.
  • Mintz, Elitzur and Porat's Peace on Earth Plan (2006)

    last update: 2016-01-31 06:00
    A plan for the resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, put forward in January 2006 by Adi Mintz, Uri Elitzur and Hanan Porat, three prominent leaders in the Israeli settler movement. The plan suggested a crackdown against Palestinian terrorism, followed by a long-term interim arrangement involving Israeli annexation of roughly 60 percent of the West Bank, granting full Israeli citizenship to around 300,000 Palestinians. The rest of the West Bank would be under a Palestinian administration forming a confederation with Jordan. Separate transportation systems would ensure uninterrupted movement of people and goods within each community. The interim period would then be followed by a permanent status agreement in cooperation with Jordan and Egypt, with the latter providing territory for the expansion of the Gaza Strip, whose status would be determined in Egyptian-Palestinian negotiations.
  • Mukhtar Pasha Proposal for the Egyptian-Ottoman Border (1892)

    last update: 2016-01-31 06:02
    A proposal submitted to the Egyptian and British governments in 1892 by Mukhtar Pasha, the Ottoman representative in Cairo, as to the border between Egypt and the Ottoman Empire. The proposal suggested that the border run from Rafah to Suez and hence to Aqaba, leaving about one-third of the Sinai Peninsula in Ottoman hands. The rejection of this proposal eventually led to the Rafah-Suez line becoming the effective border, and a similar line was formally agreed on in 1906.
  • Hebron Protocol (1997)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:58
    A protocol to the 1995 Israeli-Palestinian Interim Agreement, concluded between Israel and the PLO on 17 January 1997. Signatories were retired Israeli general Dan Shomron, representing Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, and top PLO negotiator Saeb Erekat, representing PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat. In accordance with the Interim Agreement, the protocol concerned the redeployment of Israeli forces in Hebron, the only major West Bank city not to have been previously transferred to full Palestinian control (Area C). Hebron was divided into Area H-1 (about 80 percent of the city), to be transferred to Palestinian control, and Area H-2, to remain under Israeli control. A day before its signing, the protocol was approved in the Knesset by a vote of 87 For, 17 Against; the previous day, it was approved by the Palestinian Authority and the Executive Committee of the PLO.
  • Annapolis Process - Israeli Proposal - General (2008)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:56
    An Israeli proposal for a permanent territorial settlement put forth in 2008 during the Annapolis Process, including territorial exchange involving the transfer of 6.5 percent of the West Bank to Israel, in exchange for Israeli territories amounting to 5.8 percent, with a further 0.7 percent constituting a corridor between the Gaza Strip and the West Bank.
  • Map of Israeli Settlement Outposts in the West Bank (2014)

    last update: 2016-01-31 05:43
    Reference map of Israeli settlement outposts in the West Bank, whose construction is illegal or unlicensed under Israeli law, as of 2014.